Tag Archives: Green Envelope.

13th SEPT. 1915: ‘ITS ONLY THE TIE OF FAMILY LOVE I WANT REALLY’.

Bertie in UniformPte BERTIE HIBBETT ROUEN: LETTER continued to Mother, Marie Neal HIBBETT, 95 Foden Rd Walsall

6.30 am about.

Another Sunday Monday letter. 

I am indeed making the most of my time in HospitalI have written no less than eight letters, including Ida, & Harold & there’s Sydney’s too, besides Miss Molly Evans, Mrs Hurst* & Her Ladyship Mrs Jones* & to make the list complete I must write to Mum, that’s one reason why I wrote last Friday.

Whatever the others say  Mum, I say it is a Rest to write to Mummy and I think Mum will sympathise with me & be happy at the thought of her very affectionate son,    Bertie.

PS  Of course I must have a Post Script else the letter ain’t complete. 

Now I don’t expect a long letter from Mum, although I have had comparatively long epistles which have surprised me as well as pleased me .  So I enclose the size of the letter you need to send me next if you wish. It is from the Writing Pad in the Lucky Bag I chose from the bundle sent from Ireland (1).

I enclose too some cuttings from John Bull, my word ain’t it tolerantIt does use strong views.  But I quite see in the article about ‘Blood will out’I remember Capt Tim Cozens*, so popular with the Tommies getting quite a crowd around him & he said he loved a charge.  It was when he told us about the knut leading the charge dressed practically in mufti (2).  The article also puts me in mind of the Lancashire lads you know Mum (3). Ta ta.

PS  Sorry I am not in a hurry about a letter –  its only the tie of family love I want really.  So (if) you are busy, forgive me for insinuating.  I expect I shall get your long letter tomorrow, but I will send this off tonight at any rate. 

Kind regards to Woody – safe journey back to Hospital I hope (4).

NB  Pickwick Club (5) reminds meSnodgrass (6) had a letter from May (7).  I hope Capt Flo* is a good help to Sydney getting a Commission.

 Something for you to fathom about in your spare time –  I like letters which last a long time for  you to read.  Isn’t Mrs. Hurst jolly good, I enclose her letter.  Thank you Mother for the magazine. It goes without saying that I enjoyed the perusal so to speak eh what!  Sorry Mrs Hurst’s letter must be in the incinerator with Sydney’s letter I told you about (8).

Bertie.

PS  NB 13/ 9/ 15  

Oh! I shall fall through the earth next. I have just received Basil’s long epistle  – & nearly banged my head through the back of the deck chair when I unrolled Champion’s mile long letter of such black writing but so neat.  I had another letter too, it was from Cousin Muriel*.

Have I to write in turn to such a windfall, such a gasping slap.  I think you will think I am taking things to extreme but I shall have to write a letter to you all soon & will let it be just plain & serious, so you will forgive me for this my long letter.

Oh! Basil dear Dodger. Oh! Mummy (Hush I saw your writing in Ida’s & read yours before her’s, – don’t tell her though) & Oh! Ida’s was a record for a Champion.  Yes I will tell her of a Jock we call the ‘Scotch’32 beds in my Ward.  Did you get my letter to you & Father in a green envelope dated Sunday 6th?  

Now you won’t lose any of the sheets as this last letter marked PS NB is important. 

Bertie. 

***********************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

This Letter clearly shows how important writing & receiving letters was to Pte Bertie Hibbett.  In his heightened emotional state, in an agony not to break this ‘tie with Home‘, he adds Postcript after Postscript.   

 (1) The Hospital Bag Fund (one of WW1’s many ‘morale boosting & practical schemes for soldiers’) was set up by Lady Smith-Dorrien 1881-1951 for the benefit of the sick and wounded in Hospitals and Casualty Clearing Stations. In <http://easttextile.co.uk/onewebmedia> Janette Bright 2015 writes that Volunteers produced an estimated 5,000,000 ‘Treasure Bags‘ to provide a store for a soldier’s personal treasures: papers, pay-sheets, photos & letters.  Around 12″ x 14″ in size, made of strong material (flowered cretonne preferred) each had a drawstring and could be hung where a patient could easily reach it.  Volunteers often added little gifts such as sachets of lavender and lucky charms.  In Pte Bertie Hibbett’s case his ‘Lucky Bag‘ arrived with a little writing pad & envelopes and amongst his treasures would have been his Prayer Book – & the Bible given to each soldier by the Army. Sadly it did not prevent some of his letters being lost in the Steamer De-louser when, for a day or two, he was put back into khaki.  

General Horace Lockwood Smith-Dorrien.
General Horace Lockwood Smith-Dorrien.

NB Lady Smith-Dorrien was the wife of General Horace Lockwood Smith-Dorrien who was relieved of command of 2nd Army in 1915 ‘by Lord French for requesting permission to retreat from the Ypres Salient to a more defensible position‘. Wikipedia.

(2) Lord Cardigan. Letter 10th Aug. 1915. (3) Marie Neal Hibbett’s relatives/ close friends in Ashton?

(4) Leicester Hospital.(5)  Childhood Pickwick Club. Letter 23rd April & 7th Sept. 1915.(6) Sydney’s Club nickname. (7Mary Overend.

(8) Steam Disinfectant De-louser. Letter 7th Sept 1915. (9) Dickebusch: in parish of Ypres (Ieper). Divisional Rest Camp; notorious history of soldiers ‘Shot at Dawn’.

***********************

South Staffordshire BadgeeLance Corp. SYDNEY HIBBETT & 1/5th SOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY.

CANADA  HUTS  NR DICKEBUSCH (9). 

13th Sept Mon:   In Divisional Reserve

 NEXT POST: 14th Sept. 1915.

7TH SEPT 1915: IN RED WHITE & BLUE AGAIN WITH BOILS ‘LIKE TOOTHACHE IN THE NECK’.

BERTIE HIBBETT: 19 in 1914.
BERTIE HIBBETT:

Pte BERTIE HIBBETT, ROUEN: No 9 GENERAL HOSPITAL. No 12 Ward. LETTER to IDA HIBBETT, 95, Foden Rd. Walsall.

NB  –> In Red White & Blue. Tuesday Sep 7 / 15   

PS The lavender was given me while in 5 Ward. Take care of the Twiddly bits in this letter (1).

IDA HIBBETT. 27 in 1914.
IDA HIBBETT.

My Very Dear Sister,

Now I ain’t made no mistake loike (2) as one does at th’ beginnin of year & puts nineteen 14 ’stead of 15 and begins with D instead of J eh! 

This bit of touchy ‘chirpy’ (as you calls it) nonsense, is the effect of hearing a comic song at a concert – well I will tell you that later).  I have soon been sent back to Hospital again & am now in No 12 Ward at the same local Hospital  – ie No 9 General Hospital.  There is such a ‘nicenurse’ here, her hair reminds me of yours & making me wish I had you & Woody (3) to look after me. 

I hope Mummy & Daddy will take to Woody.  I fancy she is somewhat tall & dark – is that so?  Tell me about the time you are spending with her.  I discovered after all that the little scentiment of scent sent to me in the parcel was sent from you.  I mean the lovely Whitby Heather scent.  Do you remember Sydney sending you a bottle while you were in the Royal Infirmary? (4).

I have just had one of those round biscuits, Crawford’s Kings, they are a delicious assortment.

Crawfords City Assorted packaging: used when paper was scarce.
.BISCUIT WRAPPING PAPER, Request for eggs & biscuits – ‘send just as you please, you know. Forgive me,  Bertie.1915.. (For full transcript see Page: ‘PARCELS’).

Idait is simply  a glorious, lovely, bright afternoon -that sunny effect at teatimeI’ve just had teaEverything seems sunny & the spick an’ span cleanliness of the Ward makes a great effect of brightness doesn’t it?  You know, for I’m sure The Leicester Hospital was something like this, sunny & bright.

I am scribbling this seated in a comfy easy chair facing down the Ward.  I close my eyes & fancy you strutting along the centre between the neat cots; you are dressed in spotless white apron & the uniform of the Hospital.   

 * * * ‘Does Dodger depend  —‘  Oh! Jocks just been in  – with  the Chaplain of the Hospital;  Jock was the comedian who made us all roar with larfter at the entertainment this arfternoon.  ‘Does dear Dodger depend drastically— * * *

I came into the Ward this morning in time to go to this concert party of Miss Ashwells* held in the Dining Hall at 3.   Beautiful songsters, but I felt queersomelike when a man sang a patriotic song with appealing wordssort of practice what you preach sort of effect.  But I suppose he wanted to show his fine voice for the benefit of entertaining the sodjers eh! what? 

Jock could imitate a larf an’ no mistake, a fat little chap he was & he screwed up his nose & opened his mouth & wrinkles all over his fizog, but the effort did make him sweat.  I saw him mopping his brow with his handkerchief afterwards.—

* * * ‘Does dear Dodger drastically depend on his – –  (I can’t make a sentence of dees) pocket money – his weekly allowance –  for his contribution in parcels to his two bruvvers at the front eh! what!?

I enjoyed the chocolate while a listnin’ to the singin’.  There was a violinist, I mean the one who played a large violin – forgotten the name of it –  but although she was elderly she reminded me of  your picture ‘The Violin Player (5)you. 

Thye Violinist: mary neal Richardson (American) 1859 -1937.
THE VIOLINIST: Mary Neal Richardson (1859 -1937..

Have you, by the by, got a good collection of your favourite pictures – & framed?  

Tell Mummy I quite enjoyed the eggs & ate two this morning, without salt, with a few biscuits & they tasted so creamy like, beautiful –  and I’m sure they will do me good. 

Of course the sisters came to see the fun & oh! I saw the ‘ode sisters’ of No 6 Ward & guessed they’d be somewhat disgusted, if not surprised, on seeing me again.   I did make a mistake arter all aboot the ’eddin.  The trio [Red White & Blue] was not complete  – it is now for I have just had a clean red tie given me. 

When I was discharged from Hospital on Saturday I had to get all my togging on the Sunday kit & pack & ammunition & rifle etc.  All of it had to be handed in again this morning & my khaki clothing disinfected againSo particular they be here, although I had only been in Camp 2 days

Sergeant Wilkes (a teacher) (6) really thought I had gone to Blighty when I made my appearance in his tent on Saturday I will not buoy your hopes up falsely.  He said if I had stayed in Hospital & lingered over 4 weeks  I should have gone to Blighty automatically  – & a chap with the same sores on his legs (only) went to Blighty while I was in 6 WardI saw him go.  

Hush! Ida! scribble this out with the blackest dye of ink when you’ve read it:- I have endured toothache in the necknow don’t larf that is the best description of the pain of this boil on the back of me neck. For 4 nights running I have not had a whole night’s sleepJust like toothache & as bad too, for toothache does go away sometimes during the day, but this pain lasts all day & night as well. 

Dear Ida, I do believe in some sort of transformation (sic) of the minds of people, more especially of relatives (7). You understand my meanin’?  I mean that I have no doubt that you overlook my touch of chirpiness & can see in the depths of it all that my complaint is not all bluff .  

Vernon thought boils didn’t hurt, but I know now.  And there are so many cases among the men that one doesn’t get so much sympathyAnd dear Ida that is why I do not think for a moment now that I shall come Home through boils.   I hope to get up the line with Sydney & then there might be a chance of coming Home on Leave see, more than there is in here.  

Now methinks this letter is getting long for the  censor. It looks as if I shall have to enclose it in a green

Foden de-lousing 464Foden_WD_disinsector_3About my khaki suit being disinfected (8)  It is put in a steam chamber with some chemicals in the steam to kill the — never mind! 

Well I left a letter to Sydney in one of the pockets.  It was in answer to his I sent  you & in it was Mother’s lovely letter and yours.  I did want him to read them.  I did like to send you his to see how brother writes to brother.  It was indeed unique to get a letter sent to me with the triangular Field Postage stamp.  I knew t’was from Sydney when I saw it.  

Just another thing I should like to tell you & that is you would remember the good old days of the Pickwick Club (9) (when you read Miss Edith Evans’  letter I enclosed in Mother’s letter about the childrens’ party in the Cycle Shed, an annual affair? ) I mentioned the fact to Vernon about Sydney nicknamed Snodgrass

When you were in York did you see Mr Walker*?  By the by that reminds me, did you send him those Bible markers after all?  That is the question you will answer me in your long letter.  Oh!  but I suppose it is already on the journey now from the Little Grey Home in the West, from that little white table in the little white room of the ‘Sleeping Beauty’ (10).

Ta Ta.   I remain, dear Pickwick, your affectionate brother at the front.   

Winkle’.  (11)

PSS  Have you managed to get through this puzzle of a letter?  I have had several goes at smothering my nose in the delicate khaki fabric saturated with Whitby Heather Scent. 

**********************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

(1)’Twiddly bits: Many additional comments tucked in margins/ as well a lots of underlining. (2) ‘Chirpy bits’: mixture of Black Country dialect & childhood language with lots of rhyming words, deliberate misspelling & alliteration:- e.g. scentiment (sentiment) of scent sent;  loike-like; th’ beginnin – the beginning; nicenurse-nice nurse; spick ‘n span – tidy/clean/in order/as new; sodjers – soldiers; larf/larfter – laugh/laughter;  arfternoon– afternoon; fizog – face; bruvvers – brothers; listnin‘/ singin/ meanin‘- listening/singing/meaning; ode – old; ‘eddin-heading; togging– uniform & kit ; unique – unusual; Ta ta – Goodbye.

(3) Woody: Ida’s nursing friend. (4Leicester Royal Infirmary, Infirmary Square, where Ida appears to have done basic training, 1914-1915.

(5) The Violin Player: Ida’s copy could be one by Joseph de Camp 1858 -1923 – or The Violinist. 1912Mary Neal Richardson (American) 1859 -1937. Both paintings would match Ida’s white bedroom.

220px-Edwin_Foden_1841-1911
EDWIN FODEN. 1841 -1911.

(6Serjeant Wilkes: the kind Serjeant referred to in Letter: 5th Sept. 1915. (7) Foden Compound Steam Engine/ Lorry adapted for De-lousing  & Disinfecting in WW1.  Edwin Foden, Sons & Coy Ltd :  British Truck & Bus manufacturer, based Sandbach, Cheshire. 1856.  [No connection with Foden Road, named after E.A. Foden, Lord Hatherton’s land agent, responsible for creating Walsall Arboretum 1871]. <http://www.steamscenes.org.uk&gt; Wikipedia. <http://www.1914-1918.invision.com&gt; Great War Forum Old Sweats description.

8)’Transference’ is the word Bertie means (probably not in the full 19th cent theory sense of ‘transference of thought from one person to another without the sensory / physical channels’) but his belief that Ida would understand his ‘chirpiness’ masked a real pain & his bitter disappointment at not getting a Blighty.

(9) Hibbett Pickwick Club (childhood club based on Charles Dickens‘ Pickwick Papers): begun at 106, Rowley St. in 1903 (before moving opposite to 95, Foden Rd). Aim: to collect interesting observations and report adventures.

*****  Sam Pickwick President: – Ida Hibbett.  EditorSam Weller – May Overend*. MEMBERSAugustus Snodgrass – Sydney Hibbett (8 yrs);  Tracy Tupman – Bertie Hibbett (7 yrs);  Sam Wardle  I. Cozens* (?); Nath Winkle – D. Cozens* (?) *****

10) Ida’s bedroom at 95, Foden Rd. (11) Winkle: Bertie has changed his Pickwick Club membership name.

(12) Crumps: German 5.9 inch shell or loud thudding sound as it burst. ‘the last crump’ meant the end of the War.

South Staffordshire BadgeeLANCE CORP SYDNEY HIBBETT & 1/5th SOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY

S.W. SLOPE OF HILL 60

7th Sept. Tue:  Enemy repairing parapets damaged by rainstorm, fired on at intervals during the night.  Between 11 am and 12 noon enemy fired six crumps (11) behind 35 and 36 supports and at 2.30 pm shelled West end of wood.  CASULATY: WOUNDED: 9784 Pte D. Hunt.

NEXT POSTS: 10th SEPT. 1915. 

6TH SEPT. 1915. IN KHAKI AGAIN WITH COMPASSIONATE SERJEANTS.

BERTIE HIBBETT: 19 in 1914.
BERTIE HIBBETT:
20  in 1915.

Pte BERTIE HIBBETT, No 6 GENERAL BASE ROUEN: LETTER to MOTHER & FATHER, 95 Foden Rd Walsall. 

Monday Sep. 6 / 15

My Very Dear Mother & Father,

Another repetition of having to include a Monday’s epistle with a Sunday’s.  If I had managed to get a green envelope yesterday the 1st part of this letter would have gone. 

Egg Week Chicken-poster-1-revisedIt seemed as though the letters I wrote yesterday must stay to acknowledge the ripping parcel I got this morning.   The eggs came in good condition, –  just the shells broken, but that’s all  – no mess whateverHard boiled eggs seem to be in ‘great demand’ (as Miss Bore* sais) among the SoldiersA chap had some sent him too this very morning that I got yours.Million Egg chicken-poster-2-revised 

 

I feel I ought to answer the parcel straight away, although I have not broken into all the lovely contents.  Oh Mummy I am in raptures again.  I guess you are smiling to know that your effort in sending such good ‘stuff has been another good successThere was some crossings out on Dad’s address – how dare they spoil such neat writing,  but I got it safely I shall have to write another letter shortly to say how I enjoyed the ‘assortment‘ – you have good taste for biscuits, they are fine.

I was amused at the Whitby Heather scent  – after sending the Whitby Heather soap.  I guess Dad twitched a smile when he got to know you were sending me scent, but I was sincerely delighted with such a sentiment.  Mummy & Champion’s doing I bet.  And I was doubly glad on getting a handkerchief & more so being khaki.  I intended getting one with my next pay if I get any.  I needed a hankie so.  

I was very happy indeed to see Dodger’s few words & promising me a letter I guess he was writing it for me when I was writing to him, this letter enclosed yesterday afternoon. 

I have already bought a few apples, I think fruit will do me goodPoor Sydney again.  I was rather or felt  glad now that he kept Mrs Hurst’s parcel & shared the contents with ‘Brewin*’.

I enclose Sydney’s very, very nice letter. It is isn’t it? eh what?  I want you & Ida to try and persuade Mrs Hurst* not to trouble about sending another parcel to this address.  You may think I’m mercenary, for being inclined to expect another as Sydney had the other.  As Sydney sent me her lovely letter I must write back, but if I were to tell her myself not to send me another she might take it as an insinuation – at least I do.  And you can tell Mrs Hurst it was very kind indeed of her to offer to send me The Graphic (1) . Of course now that I am out of Hospital where I got reading matter I could do with something to read, but I leave that to you.

Now when our Company Sergeant Major* went on Home Leave (sergeants 1st then privates) he saw you Mother & told me so on returning to trenchesHe said he was thinking of going up to you & telling you how I was, but he did not like the idea when he thought of the life out here.

Now, as you read in Sydney’s letter, he too has gone where Corporal A. Penning* is (2). But I think his death did not linger with pain, as I have no doubt Mrs Penning’s son did.  Gee* was his name, a relative of Queen Mary’s O.T.C. Drum & Fife Instructor. 

I am sitting on a box in a Sergeant’s tent. I was interrupted half way through this letter by the sergeant who handed me this box & told me to go & sit inside the tent as I was squatting in the grass just outside. It is sunny & fine but we have had some heavy rains lately. 

Now I must write to Sydney.  I am glad you got a letter from him.  I told him to write to you & me & got his letter with your parcel. What a happy coincidence eh!   When I read that you are kept happy in hopes of seeing Sydney & me I do pray that happiness will be fulfilled.  ‘Put your trust in the Lord & He will fulfil your heart’s desire’ (3) and the 34th Psalm, for today – The Lord delivereth the souls of His servants; and all they that put their trust in Him shall NOT BE DESTITUTE’. (4)

Best love to all,   Bertram.  

PS  Oh I am glad Sydney had opened Mrs Hurst’s parcel of chocolate (see the stains of chocolate from his finger prints) sardines (they would not make my boils any better) condensed milk (he needed that to make his tea taste nice) and yes, I am doubly glad because his rations were thin & nasty. I hope he gets a Com.  You see, I told you so didn’t I –  if not then I tell you now, that he wanted me to go to Blighty.  I know the reason & sympathise with him & it is that feeling of his that makes me want to be with him, a sort of reaction. 

We were sleeping in those beds last year at this time Mother although firing our course and in training.

*********************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

Two pictures. Two Serjeantsone saving a Mother from further anxiety – and another fetching a box for a young Private to sit on and inviting him into his tent to write home. Such simple acts of thoughtful kindness fill me with gratitude to all those who helped my Dad cope with the disappointment of not getting Home to ‘Blighty‘ with Boils.

(1) The Graphic: Illustrated Weekly Newspaper. London. famous for centre-page illustration of the Sinking of the Luisitania, May 1915.

Sinking of Luisitania.

(2) 6515 Company Serj. Major H. Gee. Killed : 26th Aug. 1915. (‘Shot through the lungs’, Sydney’s letter 29th Aug.).  Arthur Penning: only son of Mrs A. Penning, Pte Bertie’s landlady, 29 Gold Street, Saffron Walden.

(3) Psalm 37.4-5.  (4) Psalm 34 interestingly is an acrostic poem with each verse beginning with successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

South Staffordshire BadgeeLance Corpl SYDNEY HIBBETT 1/5th & SOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY.

 

6th Sept. Mon:  In BRIGADE RESERVE  – detail as 1st. CASUALTIES: WOUNDED: 8909 Pte V.C. Hough, 9149 Pte L.J. Bayley; No 9585 Pte C.F. Girling.  Relieved the 6th North Staffs in the trenches at 10.15 pm. Slightly wounded 8067  Pte J. Bradley, remain at duty.  

NEXT POST: 7th SEPT. 1915.  In Red White & Blue – no mistake.

26TH AUGUST 1915: HEAD BOILS: ‘MY BOY THEY ARE WORSE THAN A WOUND’.

BERTIE HIBBETT: 19 in 1914.
BERTIE HIBBETT:

Pte BERTIE HIBBETT, No 9 GENERAL HOSPITAL ROUEN : LETTER to Mr & Mrs A. HIBBETT, 95, Foden Rd. Walsall.

In Red White & Blue                                                   Thursday Aug 26/15

‘MY OLD PATE’.

My Very dear Mother & Father,

I’m in ecstasy over having such a shoal of letters & parcels.  Had quite a dearth & even it did not last long only about a week & a half, I got to long for something from the post as days came by. 

Now before I say anything further, let me say how very sorry I put Mother into such anxiety over ‘my poor head’ I’m practically better now, & I hope to be out of hospital soon.  Very likely the idea of me being in HOSPITAL  & the silly idea of bandaging me up like I was, has made you so anxiousApparently then you did not enquire of Harold, I told him what was wrong with me, & to him it has been an old complaint, & Harold, I presume, has not yet told you.

No doubt, dear Mummy, you understand my idea of letting you know such things ‘second hand’.  When the doctor’s assistant bandaged me up I said anyone would think I was amake believe’ of being wounded; to which he said:My boy they are worse than a wound’.

Ruswarp, Yorkshire.
Ruswarp, N. Yorkshire.  Sketch.  A.H. Hibbett. 1913.

Another thing, I was so very sorry indeed to hear, was that you had such unsettled weather, but I was glad to hear that the Sunday you went to Ruswarp (1) was fine & that the last days of the holidays the weather had ‘picked up somewhat

Mummy you have been busy writingHow very good of you to spend so much time of your holidays by so doing & such long ones too, & I got quite a lot all together.  When I received your letter of the 23rd, or rather the two letters in one posted on the 23rd, I could not wait any longer to answer in detail the parcel & letters of yesterday too, as long as opportunity was open to me to write.

So I am seated in a lovely canvas chair outside in the shade.  The weather has been sunny & bright ever since I have been in hospital.  I have enjoyed a lump or two of your (Whitby) rock & am struggling to keep my writing up to the mark.  Poor artful Dodger, ‘swishing about on the pier like an old tar’ – how could he find a corner of his seabeaten  heart to pine about his two bruvvers at the front.  Indeed I am more anxious about my younger brother getting a good result of his exam than I am of anything to do with me sen, except of course my career equally as much as his.

Did you, dear Mum, read the story in theLondon Magazine’ (2), which was included in the bundle you sent me (& Sydney) the story entitledMissing’?  It  put me in mind of two things – (first) of Jack Wade*.  An officer wearing a square white badge with a red cross on it, comes occasionally into the wards & enquires of each patient whether the patient has heard anything about so & so – missing since such & such a time.  He opens quite a volume full of nothing but lists of missing (3).

The second thought comes to me of the many mothers & relatives who are anxious about their sons missing & then of course above all, and really which hits me more than any, is the case of  Lieut. Jack Wade*.

The story in the Magazine is very interesting isn’t it?, but I was disappointed on reading the 1st letter from the soldier to his mother – the nature of it.  But did you noticeMummy’ in the second letter of his. You know he got wounded in the head & lost consciousness, but when he got better he remembered his Mother’s face & said ‘good old Mum’ in the front of it & ‘Cheero Mummy’.  Yes ’twas a nice tale but the affair about the girls I did not care much forYet they reminded me of Harold & Miss Bore  sh!  sh! (4).

I have heard such a lot from you all in a heap that I shall have to re-read & re-read again & write again in a day or so to make all things plain.   Am looking forward to the apples and socksAuntie wrote to me saying she had sent us both a parcel but I guess Sydney carried out what I told him & ate all & demolished the contents himself.  So sorry he will have to wait for the papers to read.  Yes I got three letters, a PC & two parcels besides the letters inside the parcels.  In fact I almost cleared all the post for No 6. Ward.

A letter from Idatell her I got her letter posted 9th Aug. too.  A letter from Auntie, a PC from Miss Foster*; by what she said on it I conclude you have not told her where I am & what is up with me eh?  Also a letter from Miss Winifred Evans* from Thlandidno (5) which I acknowledged by a F.P.Csame with t’others.

You told me to buy something good with your generous little ‘bit’ again so I bought a few biscuits for my supper & you say they are a good thing to eat early in a morning.  We do not get any ‘bits’ in hospital (6).  I suppose I shall go into a Convalescent Camp after coming out of Hospital, as is the general case.  A patient went to England (what is that place?) with having boils on his legsMine arn’t half or a quarter as bad, in fact they are better now.

I had a good smell at your little bit of seaweed in each letter you sent me & the heather off the moors.  Yes, I have often thought of the heather & Goathland.

Whitby. Watercolour. A.H. Hibbett. from PC The Linden Series.
Whitby. Watercolour. A.H. Hibbett. 1913.

I don’t suppose Mummy missed my coming into the apartments with sketchboard under one arm & her shopping bag filled with paints & brushes & painting material in the other, arriving late as per usual for tea & boastfully exhibiting a hideous half-finished daub on the mantlepiece.  No I think the nuisance was a good riddance what oh!  – you don’t mind me saying so eh! what.

And, dear Mummy, I kept a bit of the heather & you don’t mind me having given the sister the rest to put in her room.  I said it was from England, the Yorkshire Moors, & asked her if she knew the novel Between the Heather & the Northern Shore (7) & she remembers the York Pageant (8).  We have some heather besides some other flowers in the Ward, but she was especially thankful & blissful over the little bunch of English heather.

I had to open the parcel of eatables in her room & show the other sister what I had: result was nothing in it to do me any harm & so I had the ginger cake & apricots to enjoy at tea.  How very good of you to be so eager to send me the things I put in my letter; if I had known such nice things were forthcoming when I wrote that letter I should have felt ashamed to askfor more’ as Oliver Twist did & I feel such a glutton now.  Yet I’d love an egg.  Patients in the Ward have an egg every tea time, but they have marked on their head boards for eggs, each board having on the diet for each patient.  I am on ordinary diet with medicineSalts (9) on waking in the morning at 6.00 & iron after each meal.  Don’t you think Parish’s Food (10) would do me good for its all to do with the blood being out-of-order.

When I was opening your letter today I was expecting to see some photos in side by the feeling of the stiff paper.  You won’t forget to persuade Harold to do some for Sydney & me if he has taken any.   You will forgive me opening the letter to Sydney  which came with the Magazines.  I sent it off to him in a green envelope with Basil’s long letter.

I don’t think Mrs Hardcastle* will have to re-post any letters from me.  I sent you a letter last Friday & another on Sunday, the latter I believe I addressed to Home Let’s pray that we shall see each other before Winter comes along, but Cheero Mummy we are happiest as we are now, if we trust & believe that it is God’s Will & in His mercy hope for the best,  

Your very affec. son   Bertie. 

***************************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

(1) Ruswarp & Goathland: N. York Moor villages near Whitby.  (2) The London Magazine estab.1903 (previously Harmsworth Magazine 1898) encouraged new writers. July 1915 copy included stories by a Corporal F. Ward. (WW1 Price: a shilling).

(3) The Red Cross was the only organisation permitted by the War Office to make enquiries for the missing. Regular searches were made in Base Hospitals & Army Rest Camps abroad as well as in Hospitals in UK.  A monthly Enquiry List was circulated. (4Harold & Hilda Bore were recently engaged. (5) Llandidno, Wales. (6) ‘Bits‘/ ‘A little bit of cash‘, i.e. no pay in hospital.

(7) ‘Between the Heather & the Northern Shore‘. 1884. A second novel by Mary Linskell  b. 1840, Blackburn Yard, Whitby; one of many 19th Cent. writers associated with the town.

(8) York Pageant: Medieval Mystery/ Passion Plays (from Creation to Last Judgement; performed on Feast of Corpus Christi (23rd May – 24th June.) MS dated 1463-1477, British Library. Performed in York 1569. NB Research suggests they were originally Lincoln Mystery Plays.

(9Liver Salts: a tonic. (10) Parrish’s Food: compound syrup of iron phosphate (Syr Ferri Phos Co) first appears in Martingale’s Extra pharmacopoeia of Unofficial Drugs & Chemicals. . . 1883 (invented by Prof. Edward Parrish pharmacist, Philadelphia) cf National  Library of Medicine.

11) Verbranden Molen an old mill 300 yrds behind the Front Line, Hill 60 area.

***************************

South Staffordshire BadgeeLance Corporal Sydney Hibbett & 1/5th SOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY

26th Aug. Thur:  Enemy dropped two shells in ravine between 33 and 34 trench and one in front of 34 trench at 11. am; 4th Belgian Battery replied on enemy trenches.  Enemy aeroplane driven off by our aeroplane about 11.15 am otherwise all quiet during the day until 7. pm when the enemy shelled Verbranden Molen  (11) with about 20 shrapnel and 12 H.E. shells.  CASUALTIES: KILLED 6515 Coy S Major H.Gee*.  WOUNDED: 7800  L /Sgt S. Moore; 8783 Pte R. E. Ellens.

NEXT POSTS: 29th AUGUST 1915 will be published 31st August 2015. Apologies for delay.

24th JUNE 1915: STAFFORDS ‘A MODEL TO THE BRITISH ARMY’

South Staffordshire BadgeeSOUTH  STAFFORDS  WAR  DIARY

NEUVE EGLISE

In Hutments, BULFORD CAMP

Bertie in UniformPte BERTIE HIBBETT: LETTER to IDA, 95 Foden Rd. Walsall.

Mid-Summer Day. June 24/ 15 (1)

My Very Dear Sister,  

IDA HIBBETT. 27 in 1914.
IDA HIBBETT.
28 in 1915.

Have just read your usual three paged letter & its bucked me up further.  We have been inspected by the Army Corps General (2) you’ll know his name later; I guess it will be published.  He gave us a very encouraging address.  The Division is to be ‘lent’ to another part of the line for about three or four weeks.

Our trenches have been highly commended.  In fact our Colonel (3) said  in his personal address afterwards, that we have been praised by several other officers & our trenches were a ‘model’ to the British Army.  But we must not go with swelled heads, but in quiet determination to keep up & improve the high standard we have gained since the weeks after we started going into the trenches.  The General gave a very well spoken address, fluent and natural.

I’m comforted to read at the end of the PS, on the slip of paper, that you were not ‘put out’, or disagreed with my green envelope (4). Sydney did disagree and I was half sorry I wrote, but the lesson I can screw out of it now is what it showed we are all of us quite human, and are not always in the mood to write letters.  I think what put me down were two feelings within me, fighting one another.  One said ‘don’t fag about writing’ – another said, ‘think of Mother & acknowledge their kind thoughts & continued remembrance – & the Parcel’.   And dear Ida I hope you do, and all the others at home, appreciate the effort it takes at times to write, when one does not feel like writing sometimes.

Generally, I am very grateful to say, I love writing & think it is the best way of spending my spare timeThat is why I think I am so disgusted with myself when I feel I ought to write yet can’t collect my thoughts together.  You said it seemed a small thing to worry about, but dear Ida, small things can upset one enough to make men incompetent for THE work i.e. fighting the enemy.  

I was looking forward to a letter from home & my anxiety was completely dispersed & I was delighted when Sydney (who went for the parcels & letters for the Platoon) handed me your letter.

Best love to Mother, Father and all of you.    Bertie.

 PS  My greatest wish is that I live through the whole of the campaign & take part in it till peace is declared.  If I had Home Sickness ever so much I still don’t think I should care to be at home –  of course I could not be at home even if I wanted.

***************************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

Pte Bertrie Hibbett belonged to the 137th Brigade, relieved by the 149th Brigade on 22nd June 1915).

‘Lent to other divisions fatigues’. CHAIN OF COMMAND numbers approx: CORP: 2 or more Divisions, 50,000 – 100,000 soldiers.  DIVISION: 18,000 (full strength) with 3 – 4 Brigades. Infantry BRIGADE: 1,500 – 4,000 in 3 – 4 Battalions. BATTALION: 1000 (full strength) 3 – 4 CompaniesCOMPANY: 500 – 800 in 3 – 6 Platoons.  PLATOON: 15 – 30 soldiers.

The Staffords, many familiar with mining and explosives, had impressed the Army with their efficiency & digging speed at Wulverghem and were now needed near Ypres (Ieper), approx. 11 miles north.

Rough Map of Wulverghem & Neuve Eglise 1915, with modern roads deleted.
Rough Map  showing Wulverghem; Neuve Eglise ; Messines (Mesen); Ypres, Ouderdom & Zillebeke. with modern roads deleted.  Adapted from Michelin Map.  EFW. 2015.

(1) The Summer Solstice/ Mid-Summer Day (when sun appears highest in the sky usually 21st -22nd June) was 24th June in 1915. (2) VI Army  Corps: formed in France 1st June, 1915, under Lt. Gen. Sir John Lindsey Keir, took over the British Lines at Ypres and first engaged at Battle of Loos, October, 1915.

(3) Lt. Colonel R. R.  Raymer, Cmdg. 1/5th S. Staffs.  (4) Green Envelopefor personal information only/ ref: Letter to Ida, 5th June 1915) .

NEXT POST: 30th JUNE, 1915.  Bagpipes & Indians.

 

5th JUNE 1915: ‘SOMEHOW I DON’T FEEL QUITE HAPPY’.

 South Staffordshire BadgeeSOUTH  STAFFORDS  WAR  DIARY

NEUVE EGLISE. 

5 th June, Sat. In Hutments, Bulford Camp. Proceeded to Trenches in relief 6th Souths.

Bertie in UniformPte BERTIE HIBBETT: LETTER to IDA HIBBETT, 95, Foden Rd. Walsall.

IDA HIBBETT VAD Nurse.
IDA HIBBETT VAD Nurse. 27yrs.

Saturday May June 5th / 15.

My Dear Sister Ida,

I have addressed this to you for a reason, I should not like Mother to know, but I know you will take it in a stronger light.

Somehow I don’t feel quite happy; what causes it puzzles me.  Whether it was the bananas that spoiled all the lovely contents of the parcel; whether it was because I’ve had to borrow got no paper of my own to acknowledge the topping comforts & had to borrow this from Vernon who is lying with me on the grass listening to the army band playing waltzes – whether it’s because the latter is somewhat sentimental music or what. Could it be homesickness?

How its come about I don’t know, but there it is.  Perhaps it is very likely with regard to acknowledging this ripping parcel with topping comforts.  So I will set my pencil to work – not my pencil there it goes again, its a borrowed pencil –  Ah perhaps its because I keep writing to you to send so many articles.  Syd(ney), I at any rate, was looking forward to this parcel & was anxious about its coming when we shall be in the trenches.

Good – how delighted I felt when I saw Dad’s writing on the familiar & usual shape of the hamper.  So we shall be able to enjoy the pineapple apricots and cream in the Listeners’ Lounge. Not just because the things are good in themselves, but they will remind us & fill our thoughts of home as well as fill our tummies.

Now in my last letter to Mum on King George’s Day I said when I would write the next & would enclose it in green envelope, so no references to the army.

Mrs Evans, as Vernon has told me, in every letter she writes to him,  wishes to be remembered to Sydney & me.  Vernon said he got quite tired of repeating her wishes,in fact he admitted he had missed more than once to convey them to us.  What had we both better do, putting it frankly and squarely?  I was in puddle (sic) & made myself foolish, I could not find words in response to Mrs Evans kind wishes.  The question arises – shall we write?  Sydney, I guess you trust, has acknowledged her fine box of King Edward Chocolates.

Tea now.  We must arise & then I will put to you another puzzling personal what do you call it.  See how adjusted I am, I can’t write properly today.  There’s another ten minutes yet so I can go on for that length of time.

The Curate* I told you sent me a very nice letter.  Where the puzzle comes in is that he mentioned about his son and described an instance very nicely.  Now its about his having a son that I’m puzzled about, or rather more strictly how it concerns me.  Shall I write & congratulate him, express my pleasure of hearing of the birth or shall I let it slip by?

It’s tea time for sure now, so I’m off. 

Just finished tea. The next puzzle is a practical one.  How shall I cram all the rest I want to tell you on this page? 

I must tell you how I enjoyed the cherry wood pipe with the Lobby’s bacca (?) while with Vernon listening to the band this afternoon.  The weather has been hot again & being evening now it is the best part of the day, excepting the time before breakfast.

You’ll be amused, like Vernon was, when I now say that I struck more than half a dozen matches to keep the old chimney,  no – the new chimney going.  Everyone looked at me and made some ‘rude’ remark jokingly.  Surely its jolly good of you to send a parcel to VernonAlas he’ll have to wait till we come back from the trenches.  Harold sent another good box yesterday & you needn’t send a cigarette holder, but I should have liked a white one.  Yet the yellow and gold of Harold’s looks ‘pretty’ when the smoke curls in front of my face.  

We read the letters generally first, before looking into the parcels, because it is the spirit in which they are sent which primarly ? (sic) matters.  So it goes without saying I could write twice the length of this letter – to thank Mother & Ida for their lovely homely epistles.

Best  love Bertie  (note the ‘ie’  – see PS)

PS  Another reason why I was not up to the mark today is perhaps I was sorry on hearing about the ‘Syd’ & ‘Bert’.  Forgive me but I’m a maddun on cutting words short – ‘he’ll’ in fact means ‘he will’.  I will emphasise the ‘ie’ and ‘ney’.  I do so hope you will fathom out my writing & forgive my bad expressions.  

*******************************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

Somehow I don’t feel quite happy’ –  Bertie Hibbett is not being ironic.  He is genuinely puzzled about his feelings and writes for advice to his Sister, rather than to his Mother.  The Letter is written on scruffy paper and his writing is rushed, with lots of crossings out and additions. Postscripts are tucked in at top & bottom of pages and up the sides. In short the letter’s appearance, as well as its content, reflects Bertie’s low spirits.

Dictionary of Etiquette.
Dictionary of Etiquette.

In his copy of A Dictionary of Etiquette by Marjory Luxmore (Cassell’s Pocket Reference Library 1914) Bertie has written the following maxims on the fly cover:Manners maketh MAN’; ‘Follow the example of General Gordon, Earl Roberts, Wellington & Nelson’ and most revealing of all  ‘None so great as a Gentleman Soldier‘.

[General Charles George Gordon, 1833 -1835. Gordon of Khartoum;  Earl Roberts, 1832 -1914. Frederick Sleigh Roberts of Kandahar, Afghanistan ; Duke of Wellington, Arthur Wesley cum Wellesley, 1769 -1852. Anglo-Irish General, defeated Napoleon at Battle of Waterloo, June 1815;  Admiral Horatio. Lord Nelson, 1758 -1805. (6th son of a clergyman). Killed at Battle of Trafalgar, 21 Oct. 1805. Famous signal to his fleet: ‘England expects everyman to do his duty‘]

One hundred years on we can see Pte Bertie Hibbett is trying to do the impossible under horrendous conditions. He is trying to be a dutiful son. a soldier and a gentleman  but he is exhausted in mind and body.  In this Letter I see signs of the Shell Shock he suffered from for the rest of his life.

NEXT LETTER:  10th JUNE 1915. Dreams of Enemy Advance.

30TH MAY 1915. FRIENDLY FIRE & FAVOURITE FOOD.

South Staffordshire BadgeeSOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY

WULVERGHEM TRENCHES 

22nd May, Sat:  N. M. Farm 10 A.R. and 10A support shelled. CASUALTY: 8533 Pte H. Rochford  (wounded?). 23th May, Sun: 50 yards of enemy parapet blew up on our left.  Artillery on both sides very activeInaccuracy of our supporting Battery reported to 1st Brigade RFA (1) & 137th Inf. Bde.

Trench 8 Wulverghem. May 1915.
 Pte Bertie Hibbett’s Trench 8 , Wulverghem, May 1915. http://libguides.juniata.educ/

24th May, Mon:  Enemy shelled Trenches 8 (Bertie’s), 9A, 9B, 10B and 10B (support) damaging parapets and traverses.  Inaccuracy of our own supporting battery again reported. Relieved by 6th Souths about 11.20 pm.  ‘A’ Coy  (Bertie’s) remaining in support. CASUALTY: 7787 Pte (Dr) A. Fitzer (2) slightly wounded.

25th May, Tue: In Hutments, Bulford Camp. (‘A’ Coy supporting 6th South).  26th May, Wed: ‘B Coy relieved ‘A’ Coy in support. 27th May, Thur:  In Hutments, Bulford Camp. 28th May, Fri: Proceeding to trenches in relief of 6th Souths at 8.15 pm. CASUALTY:7251 Sgt B. Stephens wounded.

29th May, Sat: Wulverghem. Enemy shelled 9C, otherwise quiet day.  ‘C’ Coy, 8th R. Brigade (3) attached for instruction in Trench duties.  30th May, Sun: Very quiet day.  CASUALTY: No 9218 Pte E. Hayes wounded.

Sap Trench into No Man's land. Soldiers had to bend their backs.
Sap Trench into No Man’s Land.  Soldiers had to bend their backs before ‘going over the top’.
BERTIE HIBBETT: 19 in 1914.
BERTIE HIBBETT:
19 in 1915.
A.H.H. Own War Diary: A Little Book of Words & Doings‘. ‘Trinity Sunday. 30th May 1915. New sap (4).  Picket duty in the rye in front (5). Found good souvenir of nose of shell. Read Revelation’ (6) .  

Pte BERTIE HIBBETT:  LETTER to Mother, Marie Neal Hibbett, 95, Foden Rd. Walsall.

Trinity Sunday.  May 30th / 15

My Dear Mother,

A lovely sunny afternoon again with a cool breeze. I am with Vernon & one Cecil Jackson*, a bank clerk in the United Counties (7).  I can picturemysel’ coming away from Sunday School for it is after 4. 0’ clock.

I have just re-read your letter & Basil’s jolly one. Some weeks ago a Tommy made the pun that ‘Kitcheners were with us‘ – yes in packets; we get some of the ‘Express & Star’ Martins cigarettes once a week – but last night Kitcheners, in the flesh and blood, came from London lot of  RBs. (8)

Yes we all miss Lieut P.* both officers and men (9). He was our Captain’s right hand man & before you told me he was a clergyman’s son he put me in mind of the Rev. E.M. Darling* in his manner, stature & many other characteristics.  

Mother Abergele 1914
Mother : Marie Neal Hibbett, Abergele. August 1914. Watercolour. Arthur H. Hibbett. Aged 19.

You must go on the usual procedure for the Summer holidays (10).  I’m sure you will need a rest and Father too.

I wish I could say more on the matter but I’m afraid this letter won’t go in the green envelope now I’ve put something in about the army (11).

Basil will enjoy hay-making with Les (12).  I heard from Allen*, with whom I had a long chat on Thursday evening, that Tom (Ser) is not well, got something the matter with his leg & injured his left hand.  He’s as bad as if he were out here I’ll be blowed.

I was on duty as a picket this morning & had to lie in the long tall rye, the sun beating upon my neck.

St Athan; Trinity Shield.
Shield of the Trinity. Creed of  St Athanasius.

I pictured you in St Paul’s singing the Creed of St Athanasius (13) & I guess you will perhaps go to Rushall Church (14) for an evening walk as well as to the service, if the weather is like it is here.

We have had orders to do away with pants & I shall be sorry if you have sent some off to Syd before you heard from me.  The weather is so hot that I am without vest & tunic.   I had a lovely wash with a tablet of oatmeal Mrs Hurst* sent me, another generous lady.

Should you get this letter before you buy or send a pipe then, Mother, as you do not care for a ‘man’ to smoke a pipe don’t go to the expense of getting one, but if you have already taken steps then send the pipe.

I enclose an extract from Harold’s letter I got the time we were in the trenches the Sat before Syd’s birthday.

We relish the following  – & Oh dear Mother, it is so kind of you to say it is a pleasure to you to think out what to send us in parcels – Lemon curd, I tin of Cafe -au- lait, I tin Pineapple with tin cream, Bird’s Lemonade with sugar or  1 bottle of Symington’s Lemonade crystals, 1 loaf currant bread, tea cakes.  I for my part like caraway seed in them and occasionally could you put a cake in?  Although we’ve had 3 cakes Syd couldn’t keep them so long & besides he gave a slice all round the hut with his usual generous manner. (I helped him).  A cake makes the parcel complete, but see that it’s packed well (of course forgive me just saying so for you always send a well packed parcel).

We could do with some sugar to go with the Lemonade or Cocoa and the Cafe au lait needs a little; also if you send any currant bread, or tea cakes, butter would be a great welcome.  Many thanks for the last lot of butter & bread which we greatly appreciated.

Now I’ve said my say with regard to Parcels I can’t help but feel ashamed of my greediness.

Now make a nice Sunday tea.

Bertie Hibbett's drawing of a tea cup. Aged 8.
TEA CUP & SAUCER blue pattern for ‘Dear Mother from Bertie’:  Drawing by Bertie Hibbett.  Aged 8 or 9.

Goodbye for the present.  I pray that Mother will have a quiet, goodnight’s sleep.  

Your affec.  son,  Bertie.

******************************

ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

(1) RFA: Royal Field Artillery. (2ADoctor‘ (medical or academic) was not automatically an Officer. (3R.B. – Rifle Brigade. See Forces War Record website & http://www.1914-1918. The Long Long Trail.(4) Sap: a shallow  trench dug from the Front Line into No Man’s Land to approach enemy without detection. Trenches: useful info. http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki

(5) Picket Duty: Sentry Duty (to warn of enemy advance –fully armed in pairs, 2 hrs) . Pte Bertie Hibbett appears to be out of the sap in No Man’s Land with only the rye for protection. (6) Book of Revelation: the only Book of Prophecy in New Testament. An Apocalyptic Vision of a New Heaven & a New Earth.

(7) United Counties Bank, Wolverhampton. 1907 -1916 when acquired by Barclay’s Bank, together with Birmingham District, Counties Bank & Bradford Old Bank. See Lives of the First World War  <https://www.archive.barclays.com&gt; .(8Rifle Brigade. http://www.1914-1918. The Long Long Trail. Another indication that QMS 1/5th S.Staffs differentiated themselves from Kitchener’s New Army?

(9Lieut. Parr* compared with the Revd. E. More Darling*, Vicar of Walsall. His‘A’ Coy. Captain was Captain Cecil Lister DSO*.  

(10) Family Summer Holidays alternated between Abergele, Wales and Whitby, Yorkshire.  (11Green Envelope:  First issued April 1915. Soldiers were on their honour to write only personal matters. (12) Les & Tom Ser. ref. to Staffordshire farm where Basil (future agricultural engineer) helped out at weekends & holidays?

(13) Athanasian Creed: (Latin: Quicunque Vult). Book of Common Prayer, 1662.  Summary of Christian Doctrine of Trinity & Christology, to counter heresies re Nature of God.  St Athan- Symbol Interpreted[Traditional authorship St Athanasius, 296-373 AD, Archbishop of Alexandria, now questioned. Used in Western worship since 6th Cent. on Trinity Sunday & other festivals. Rarely used today] .

(14) Rushall Church, Walsall where Ida Hibbett is buried & SgtSydney Hibbett is commemorated (a mile from 95, Foden Rd, Walsall).

NEXT POST: 3rd June 1915. Update Welcome.