Tag Archives: QMS Magazine 1916.

21ST MAY 1916: ‘AREN’T THESE LARGE BUTTERCUPS FROM THE TRENCHES?’

South Staffordshire Badgee1/5th SOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY

FONQUEVILLERS. 

18th May Thur. 12.45 am to 1.30 am: Enemy fired 18 canister bombs (1) which fell between ‘A’   Company’s advanced posts and company Headquarters. All communication trenches damaged. 1.45-2.15 am 12 canister bombs fell between No 4 and 5 posts. No damage. 10.15 pm – 10.45 pm 12 canister bombs fell between No 4 and 2 Posts. LIVERY STREET damaged (2).

Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby) Regt. badge.
Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby) Regt. Badge. <http://www.northeastmedals.co.uk&gt;

19th May Fri. 8.30 pm: 6 canister bombs fell between No.1 and No 2 posts. No damage. Our Artillery retaliated on GOMMECOURT PARK.  Enemy whizz-banged (3) in vicinity of HeadquartersRelieved by 1/5th SHERWOOD FORESTERS (4). Marched to billets at SOUASTRE (5).

20th May Sat: SOUASTRE. Marched to new billets at LUCHEUX (6). Arrived at 2.0 am. 

21st May Sun: LUCHEUX. In Rest Billets. Battalion Training.

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Bertie in UniformPte BERTIE HIBBETT: A Little Book of Words & DoingsNew draft of officers. Saw Lieut. Sanger* with whom I had a nice chat; he was  later over No 2 Platoon. Illustrated Sniper Atkins and substituted a verse about the Kaiser in place of ‘Atkins loves his pal the rifle’ (7).

Sniper Atkins Indides pages
Sniper Atkins: Top right verse: ‘Tommy has a lucky ‘go’ His sharp eye spots the Kaiser. Tommy says: “Just arf a mo” Take this to make you wiser’. 1 shot. 2 shots. 3 shots.’  NB Three camouflaged German snipers with rifles in the tree.

LETTER to MARIE NEAL HIBBETT, 95 Foden Rd Walsall.

‘. . . among the sundry and manifold changes of the world. . .’ (8). ‘I have yet many things to say unto you’ (9).

Collect and Gospel for:– 4th Sunday after Easter. May 21/ 16

My Very Dear Mother,

How very, very sorry indeed I felt, when I read your letter (in with Ida’s) dealing with the manner Sydney behaved.  Yes Sydney is often thoughtless & I think it is rotten to have divided affection.  I say ‘Mother the Queen of the Home – Ist A1. Then if you like —someone else A2,  but to me Dad & Mum are equally A1.  ‘Ah wee’, as the French say, the first few lines of Chapter XXII are disappointing. Yet a Mother can forgive & that will turn the story beautiful.

The weather is excellent, fine & sunny & of course I am wondering what sort of Sunday you are having.  Oh No! Jones* left the letter untouched, I arrived in time. I did not understand the matter about the photo, I overlooked that & was more interested in the other news in the letter. Jones* is going to give me Sydney’s watch today. I shall try & get it before tea-time just for curiosity in case you think of it in conversation during tea hour.  I told you before that I have written to the 3rd Field Ambulance.  I have received very nice letters during the week from Miss Foster* (one of hers was returned to her).

<http://www.en-wiki.org.uk&gt;

Miss Bore* sent a PC & letter & Pearson’s Magazine (10) to the Hospital on the 5th May.  I got it yesterday. [Ed. i.e. 17th May].

Pearson's Magazine Oct 1915.
Oct. 1915.
Sir Arthur Pearson
Sir Arthur Pearson. 

 

 

 

 

 

Jolly old Vernon wrote a nice long letter from Ripon, No 6 Coy. No 1 Hut, No 3 Camp, Northern Command Depot (11).  Perhaps you would like to write to him.  You told me in one of your letters he was not any better & that he had been sent to Ripon.  His brother Norman* is Editor of the Junior School Magazine. I am patronising his office by sending him my doggerel  ‘Sniper Atkins’ – Illustrated.  You may think I am vain to send it, but my idea of giving them pleasure exceeds the former idea of vanity & I thought if the C.O. commended it (& every Tommy I have shown it to has been highly amused & many have suggested that I should send the poem to some paper) that I should.  I conclude that I humbly  beg the Editor, Mr. N. Evans* to give me his opinion as to whether my doggerel is worthy of being published in his respected School paper. 

Sydney once told me not to be so ‘gushing’ in my letters to him, & about him at Home. But Vernon is worse to me than I was with regard to Sydney.  He apparently has changed right round.  In spite of the old saying  that we love one another more when parted.  I think Vernon will remain true now (this is between you & me Mum). 

Going back to ‘Sniper Atkins’ again.  I may say that I have made an Illustrated Copy for you Mum first, but should you discover that someone else has a copy before you, it will be because I wrote it on paper to fit an envelope.  This size notepaper will not go into a ‘green’ envelope without folding.

Doesn’t Arthur Brown* look old in the Observer? & I didn’t know he was Sergt.  On leaving the Batt. he only had 2 stripes showing. Of course he was once Acting Orderly Sergeant. Well, I looked over & over again at the photos but could not recognise Brown until I began to read the names underneath.

Tommy's Cooker.
Tommy’s Cooker.

This morning I received the Refill for the Boots Cooker. I have noticed that the labels always come & do not get torn off.  This reminds me that I made a delicious mess tin of coffee for supper with that you sent me; Cliff Hackett* was only too willing to give me ‘du lieu (12). Cyril Hinde* returned from Leave a day or so ago. Yesterday I went & talked with him in the field by the huts.  He wishes me to say that he was sorry he could not find time to see you.

I am afraid my Sunday letter is not altogether a success. I cannot write properly today somehow, this being a ‘green’. I may enquire of you if that Refill was rather expensive, & if I have asked you for anything that taxes your pocket?  But the advantage of the Refill comes when you send anything to be made into hot drinks & there are no fires to be had; also when our tea & bacon go cold or if we wish to make Welsh Rare Bit. 

Oh I won’t arf make ye larf (at least I’ll try my best) in my next letter, but my sketches would not be Sundayfied if I enclosed them with this.  I am getting quite a Rival of Bairnsfather and what two tasks have appeared at first  incapable of accomplishment have both come out successful to the commendation of all.  I have sent Field PCs to all those who wrote last week.  I must not forget to tell you I had a letter from Mrs Hurst* today & she told me of her meeting with you & Ida on Monday. Her letter, curious enough, was dated  May 17th.

I hope poor Sydney had a Happy Birthday and got your parcels safely.  I well remember last year how I smoked his health from a pipe for the 1st time and how the Overends sent him a cake & toffees etc.

Talking about a pipe, you need not send me anothercertainly of course not.  I am so sorry Ida’s cigarettes have also gone astray.  But there seems to be hope after having Miss Bore’s letter & Harold’s parcels from there (13).

searchGoing to hear Mr Darling* preach at Streetly this evening ? (14).

Aren’t these large buttercups (from the trenches)?

Best love to all,  Bertie.

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ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

According to 8th Sherwood Foresters this part of the Line at Fonquevillers was reported to be ‘about the quietest on the whole of the Western Front’.  For the 1/5th South Staffords, it must have been a very welcome relief after the traumas of Vimy Ridge. Apart from the bombardment of 18th & 19th May, many ‘A Quiet Day’ enabled Pte Bertie Hibbett to lose himself in  his ‘two tasks’  – writing his Sniper Atkins doggerel and illustrating it in a way that he hoped would make people laugh. He recognised that it was not ‘Sundayfied’ – not really in keeping with Christian values even when read ironically.  It makes me recall my question as a child of how many people my father had killed in the War –  & his reply that he thought he ‘might have killed one’!

My father’s growing maturity is seen in his attempt to resolve misunderstandings between his brother Sydney & his Mother – and his happiness in resolving those between himself & his best pal Vernon, through their experience of war. 

Minenwerfer.
Minenwerfer (mine launcher’/ short range mortar.

(1) Canister bombs: fired from German trench mortars or minewerfersexploded ‘with devastating effect causing almost visible shock-waves through the earth. . . very slow moving through  the air. . . possible to watch bomb as it approached, turning end over end’ as it fell – but its ‘unnerving tendency to swerve at end of flight’ made direction of escape a matter of guess work. Alan MacDonald: A Lack of Offensive Spirit?

Whizz bangs Concert Poster Dec. 1916.
Whizz Bangs’ Concert Poster. Dec. 1916.

2) Livery Street: communication trench leading to Front Line at Fonquevillers. Other names: Stafford Avenue, Lincoln Lane, Leicester Street, Derby Dyke, Roberts Avenue, Rotten Row, Regence Street, Raymond Avenue, Crawlboys Lane. All needed extensive repair before the ‘Big Push‘ to come.

(3) Whizz-bang: Tommy’s slang for light shells/ named for sound made when fired from smaller calibre field guns.

(4) Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby) Regt. 1881: Pte Bertie Hibbett was attached when 1/5th Staffords went to Egypt, Dec 1915/ Jan 1916.

(5) Souastre: small village, Pas-en Artois, over exposed ridge, 2 miles west of Fonquevillers/ damaged. (6) Lucheux: medieval town in Picardie, 18 miles SW of Arras. 12th cent Church & 15th cent Chateaux with moat. Relatively undamaged. See Map: Hibbett Letters 10th May,1916.

(7) Sniper Atkins: (not yet established whether Express & Star or QMS School Magazine published it). Text:  Sniper Atkins. Composed by a Sniper.

Sniping Allemands All day long To the tune of British guns. Cooly sniping with A song, Sending greetings to the Huns. I shot 2 shots 3 shots.  Sniper Tommy spots a Bosche And gains a ripping goal And he sees him dive – splosh! Down his muddy hole. I shot etc.

Placing five rounds in tin can Then another up the spout Tommy spies another man So gives the Bosche an awful clout. Tommy has a lucky ‘go’ His sharp eye spots the Kaiser. Tommy say Just ‘arf a Mo’ Take this to make you wiser. I shot 2 shots 3 shots etc.

Atkins with his glasses spies A Jerry working party. Keenly marks it with his eyes Just ‘Wait & See’ me hearty. I shot etc. Opponent snipers in some trees Little knowing of their fate, When Tommy snipes at what he sees They’ll sing no more their hymn of hate. 1 Shot 2 shots 3 shots etc.

Atkins aims at a machine gun & hits the Hun behind it. Oh! my word what jolly fun It fairly makes his sides split. I shot 2 shots 3 shots.

(8) Collect for 4th Sunday after Easter. Book of Common Prayer 1662: O Almighty God, who alone canst order the unruly wills and affections of sinful man; Grant unto thy people that they may love the things which thou commandest & desire that which thou dost promise; that so amongst the sundry and manifold changes of the world, our hearts may surely there be fixed where true joys may be found. Through Christ our Lord(9) Gospel of St John 16.12-13: quotation continues: ‘When the Spirit of truth is come, the Spirit will guide you into all truth’. 

(10) Pearson’s Magazine: founded 1896 by Sir Cyril Arthur Pearson, blind newspaper magnate, 1866-1921. Founded Daily Express. Founded St Dunstan’s for soldiers blinded in WW1 (now Blind Veterans UK). Published short stories/articles on literature, arts/ politics of ‘socialist bent/ advertisements for patent medicines & ‘get rich quick’ schemes/ first to publish a cross-word.

(11) Northern Command Depot Ripon: for Service/ Labour  Units. Also for re-habilitation of soldiers too fit for Convalescent Camp but not yet fit enough to return to their Unit/ the Front.

(12) ‘du lieu’ ‘in the place of’: Cliff Hackett* had given him hot water earlier in week.(13) No 3 Field Ambulance/ Hospital where Pte Bertie went to rest his trench foot and shattered nerves after Vimy Ridge.

All Saints Streetly Staffordshire.
Church of All Saints Streetly.

(14Church of All Saints, Streetly: built 1908. 6 miles north of Birmingham near Aldridge & Sutton Coldfield. Named from Icknield Street /Roman Road.

 

NEXT POST: 24th May 1916.

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28TH APRIL 1916: BALMY BALLAD MORAL: ‘CONSIDER MOTHER BEFORE EITHER BROTHER’.

South Staffordshire Badgee1/5TH SOUTH STAFFORDS WAR DIARY

CHELERS.

22nd – 30th Apr: Battalion Training.

APRIL CASUALTIES:  OFFICERS KILLED.1.  WOUNDED 3.  OTHER RANKS KILLED9. MISSING BELIEVED KILLED. 6. WOUNDED 28. Slightly wounded remained at duty 2. Self Inflicted Wound.1.

Signed: W.A. WISTANCE, Major Cmdg 1/5th South Staffordshire Regt.

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Bertie HibbettPte BERTIE HIBBETT, No 3 FIELD AMBULANCE NORTH MIDLAND DIVISION: LETTER to BASIL HIBBETT, 95 Foden Rd Walsall.

Friday April 28th/ 16.

P.S. Trusting this reaches you none too late, if not ‘on the right’. (1)

Oh! Restless Child Wait & See Do not dare be wild – ‘They’ have need of thee. (2)

Mye Jollye Olde Dodger,

I can’t say in this what I mean by ‘they’, perhaps the censor would blush and perhaps do more than that if I ‘let out’, but you know that word covers a lot of reasons.  Of course I don’t believe you were all that serious when you spoke of ‘attesting’. (3)

Now:- Dearest, Dutiful, Dodger. Don’t die! Balmy Bertie blubbers badly, Boo bye! Sergeant Sydney swanks splendidly, Shoo shy! (4)

GoathlandEd290912
Goathland,  North York Moors.

What think you on that? Of course  do not dare to show Dad, ’cause as you said we know what Dad is? (perhaps?) but I remember, when I lost my walking stick on the Moors at Goatland sic (5) & had a poetic fit, how Dad behaved when I began to recite my ‘balmy ballad’. 

Still these little bits of doggerel have their moral – for instance, although Bertie blubbers (which is a lie) and Sydney swanks (which is true)Basil must learn from that:- to ‘Consider Mother before either brother’ – and that I think puts the cap on’t.

Yes the Queen of Seasons, bright (6), she finds me still in the War Zone, but bless her, she has cheered us downhearted ones all up, by her gorgeous appearance since Easter began.

Ah! my dear Loidies & Jellyfish (7) who write such pathetic & stinging epistles to the humble self!  We have a vast lot to be grateful for although the War will be all over soon (America) (8). Just let your minds run (but take care you catch ’em again) across to Aye joipt (Egypt) & think of those who have been besieged since Dec. 1915 & perhaps have never seen Home for two years or more (9).

The best thing I can tell you to do (the thought is not mine originally) is to do what Mum said to me in a past letter:-  When I feel ‘like that’ I go out for a walk, whether it is snowing, raining or what. (Now methinks dat’s goot adtvice an’ it don’t cost yer even a ‘penning’ sic (10).  Go, bathe thyself in the flood of Spring Sunshine and charm away thy dross feelings with the song of the lark’ – ahem!

My word! the Easter parcel was a ripper, everything that we could desire –  an’ above all sent with your combined love.  I did larf at the article in the QMS (11) & tried to read as much as I could, those you marked, before I left for the Field Ambulance, where I am still. The hooters that hooted for their own mischievous lust!

Sydney told me how you’d growed, that explains the meaning of you writing : the expansion due to several causes eh? –  an’ I doubt not you’ve expanded both in height & width. My word, I can’t allow this Sydney alarmed me by adding that you were taller than me.  I expect you will stand up on your bed on May 1st morning to see if you have gained another inch since you digested your Christmas pudding.

Well I will close now with my best love to Mother & Father & Sister – & Harold I guess:

Vous avez Bon Native Jour, Je espère.

Votre beloved Bertie.

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ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

This Letter shows Pte Bertie Hibbett’s love of dialect, rhyming words and alliteration in his banter with his brother. It had a serious purpose – to persuade Basil not to attest on his 18th birthday – for the sake of their parents. He loved him for wanting to be with his brothers but raw experience had changed Bertie’s attitude to War since he volunteered in Aug.1914. The ‘Big Push’ Battle of the Somme was in preparation and the War might be over before Basil was conscripted.

(1) ‘On the right’ /‘on the right day’ i.e. Basil’s Birthday, 1st May. (2) ‘They‘ – their parents, not the Army.

(3) ‘Attesting‘ – signing up as volunteer in the Army on /after 18th Birthday. cf Hibbett Letters 2nd Mar.1916; 27th Oct 1915. Also http://www.firstworldwar.com/atoz/derbyscheme.htm.

(4) Doggerel with nonsense rhyme, nevertheless with a serious note/ Bertie was very anxious that Basil did not join up until it was compulsory so as not to add to his parents’ anxiety.

(5) Goathland: North York Moors /near Whitby where Hibbett family went on holiday alternate years. Bertie’s ‘Goatland’ links with ‘giddy goat’. See definition, Hibbett Letter 18th Aug. 1915. (6‘Queen of Seasons’ i.e. Easter, from the Hymn ‘Come ye faithful raise the strain’ See Hibbett Letter 23rd April 1916.

(7) ‘Loidies & Jellyfish’: Ladies & Gentlemen. (8) America: hopes appear to have been high for American intervention but it took two years (after the sinking of the Lusitania by German submarine, 7th May 1915, when 128 Americans went down with the ship) before the USA entered the War, 6th April 1917.

Long Long Trail.Railway_construction_across_the_Sinai_during_World_War_I_Aust_OH_Photo_597
Railway in Sinai Desert. 1916.

9) B.E.F. Campaign in Egypt: April 1916 saw the building of a railway across the Sinai Desert to serve Allied advance on Ottoman/German forces at Battle of Romani 3-5th August 1916. See Long Long Trail.

(10) Walk to lift one’s spirits when restless/ down hearted/troubled. ‘That’s good advice and it doesn’t cost you a penny’. (11) Queen Mary’s School Magazine , April 1916 Number?

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NEXT POST:  1st May 1916.

 

23RD APRIL 1916: EASTER FINDS ME ‘UNABLE TO KEEP THE FEAST’.

Bertie HibbettPte BERTIE HIBBETT, No 3 FIELD AMBULANCE, NORTH MIDLAND DIVISION B.E.F. (1): LETTER to ALL at 95, Foden Rd Walsall.

Easter Sunday. Ap 23rd 1916

‘Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us; therefore let us keep the  Feast’. (2)

‘Now the Queen of Seasons bright With the Day of Splendour, With the Royal Feast of Feasts Comes the Joy to render’. (3)

My Very Dear People,

Bright, sunny weather greeted us all as we got up this Easter morning.  I do so hope you too are having the same. But, queer enough, between the two great days it has rained somewhat heavily.

What a capital, ideal Easter parcel you sent dears – Mum, Dad & all.  I went down to Sydney & we opened it, with another parcel from Miss Foster* to us both in front of us .  How striking the beautiful Easter picture looked, the first thing that proclaimed itself as we took off the lid.  The parcels came just in time for Easter & before I left the Coy. for this place, No 3 Field Ambulance, North Midland Division, B.E.F.

This Easter morning, the parcels arriving yesterday, Saturday, I took them down myself to Sydney.  What a delightful brotherly feeling pervaded the air while I was with him, but now it has come my turn once again to leave him, for how long I can’t say. My case is not bad, it is prevalent among the majority of the men, my usual skin disease (4).

So eventually Easter Sunday finds me here, unable to ‘keep the Feast’ (2) as I should have liked, attending Parade Service, & Holy Communion which generally follows But I have reaped a little consolation from Miss Foster’s little book ‘Wayside Memories’ (5 which I will send as soon as I get a green envelope. There is a quotation which says: ‘a little lifting of the Heart suffices –  – – one act of inward worship, though upon a march & sword in hand, are nevertheless acceptable to God.’ (6).

Easter Dawn. Postcard sent to soldiers from St peter's Church Paddington. 'At our Easter Communion we are Praying for You.
Easter Dawn. ‘Lo I am with you alway’. 

I was so sorry on reading that you thought of not going to St Paul’s today, if I was not with you. But, dear Mum, what does the title for the Easter picture for the soldiers say; ‘Lo, I am with you alway’ (7). Does Ida remember the Happy Easter morning when we all went to Communion (Choral) & sang ‘Jesus Christ is risen today, Allelluia’ (8) and does dear Mum remember scooting off to Sunday School on the cycle?

Many thanks for the Hot Cross buns, cake, cigarettes & the Easter Egg.  I left the sardines for Sydney, also the cocoa, milk & sugar.  I have enjoyed a lovely day & ate the chocolate egg when Basil & his two brothers used to eat them –  ie after Easter dinnerI enjoyed a ‘nice’ tea with the cake today & pictured you all with Harold &  Miss Bore at tea.

I let Sydney have the pencil as it is of more use to him, being one who has to make notes etc.  After reading & digesting in little time to enjoy it as well, the Q.M.S. Magazine, those articles that Dodger earmarked, I left the magazine for Sydney while I brought the Parish (Church) Mag. with me.  While squatting by his side I heard him give acclamations of sad surprise on seeing the photos of the OTC casualties, but the smiling face of Sergeant Fenton* reminds me of Sydney’s quick answer to Mother’s question which was his favourite hymnRejoice again I say Rejoice’ (9) – ‘being sorrowful yet alway rejoicing’ (10). I shall put in for sick leave when possible, so be not anxious dearies.

I see that you are having the Hallelujah Chorus tonight, which I loved Dad to play.  I hope Dad will have a good rest this holiday & Mum will get well soon.  Perhaps you will think this letter not such a nice one as my usual, but I have such a great thoughts of you I can’t express or know what – or how much to say.

Silk Cigarette Cards: belgium & Serbia.
Silk Cigarette Cards: Belgium & Serbia.

I enclose some more silk cards (11), tell me if you get them, which I send for you Mum  – & Ida if she would like one, & Basil, with my heart’s love to you all.  I am writing to Harold, Ida & Basil soon. 

With our combined love & wishes from

Your loving Bertie.

PS Am sending little book later – tell me if you get it, it will be in a Stationary Envelope (6).

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ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB
ELIZABETH HIBBETT WEBB

Pte Bertie Hibbett may have felt that he could not ‘keep the Feast’ in the traditional sense of attending Church services and family gatherings but to me these Letters Home show how deeply my father understood the true meaning of Good Friday & Easter. Like Brother Lawrence of the Resurrection, he practised the Presence of God in the midst of suffering & sacrifice,   ‘As sorrowful yet alway rejoicing’.  

The Hibbett family sent a picture in their Easter Parcel with the message ‘Lo, I am with you alway’.  The sight of it gave great comfort and strength to him & his brother, and I am almost certain it was the same picture sent to Bandsman Thomas William Stubley, Killed in Action, 16th May 1916 – see Derby Church House website <http://www.derby.anglican.org&gt;Grateful thanks to Wendy Pockson & Dave Feltham.

(1) Field Ambulance: a Mobile Front Line Medical Unit (not to be mistaken for a vehicle), organised by the RAMC. Each Infantry Division had 3 F.As, each divided into 3 sections, each with 10 officers, a stretcher bearer & tented subsections. See The Long Long Trail <http://www.1914-1918.net/fieldambulances> 

John of Damascus.
John of Damascus.

(2) ‘Christ our Passover . . .’: 2 Corinthians 5.7. St Paul Approx AD 57. cf Exodus 12/ Angel of Death passes over the houses marked with the Blood of the Lamb. (3) ‘Now the Queen of Seasons bright. . .’ verse in Easter Hymn: ‘Come ye faithful raise the strain of triumphant gladness ‘John of Damascus c 675 -749. Syrian Monk & Christian Priest/lived in Jerusalem Orthodox Monastery. English Transl. 1853. John Mason Neale 1818- 1866. Anglican Priest & hymn writer/ Oxford Movement.

(4) ‘Skin Disease’: blood disorder/ boils that put Pte Bertie in Hospital, Aug -Oct 1915 & Dec. 1915-Jan 1916. cf Hibbett Letter 2nd Nov. 1915. (5) Godmother’s Little Book Wayside Memories/ which Bertie sent on to his Mother in a green envelope.

(6) ‘A little lifting of the heart: Brother Lawrence of the Resurrection. Practised the Presence of God’ cf Hibbett Letter 16th April 1916.

(7)  ‘Lo I am with you alway even to the end of the world’: Matt. 28 20. c AD 85. (8) ‘Jesus Christ is risen today’: 14th Cent Latin Hymn ‘Surrexit Christus hodie’/ author unknown. English Transl. John Baptist Walsh. Charles Wesley added a 4th verse. Music: ‘Easter Hymn'(Lyra Davidica).

9) ‘Rejoice I say . . ‘:  Philippians 4.14. St Paul approx. AD 49 -51.(10)  ‘Sorrowful yet alway rejoicing’. 2 Corinthians 6.10. KJV. St Paul AD 57 approx. 

(11) Silk Cigarette Cards: See Hibbett Letters 14th April 1916; 18th June 1915.

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NEXT POST: 25th April 1916.  (Letter, posted in Derby not received by Bertie Hibbett until April 1918).